Day 8: Podcasts

Back in the early 2000s a new audio format emerged that at first baffled me, then intrigued me and then became part of my life.

Podcast header

Back in the early 2000s a new audio format emerged that at first baffled me, then intrigued me and then became part of my life.

Radio has been an important part of my life since the late 80s when I would listen to music, live sport and even film reviews on Radio 2 (many years later I would be doing just that job).

As technology improved over the decades and allowed users to have a powerful computer in their pocket (MP3 players and then smartphones), audio wasn’t just restricted to radios, CDs and tapes.

When the BBC conducted a trial to put radio shows online as podcasts (like Radio 4’s In Our Time and Five Live’s Mark Kermode’s film reviews) it felt like an audio revolution was brewing.

Today you can listen to all kinds of content: comedians in their garage interviewing the US President (Marc Maron), Private Eye in audio form (Page 94), and outstanding long form radio documentaries (Radio 4’s Germany: Memories of a Nation).

Whilst it is true that a lot of podcasts still rely on repurposed content from ‘old media’, a lot have launched independently and the costs of entry are lower than starting a radio station.

Having cancer is incredibly isolating and when I go out for my daily walks, it is good to have a podcast to keep me company.

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Playlist

  • Real Time with Bill Maher, Episode 379 (HBO Podcasts)
  • Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000), AMC/Freeview on BT

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